SPECIFY THE APPROPRIATE AMOUNT OF LIGHT OUTPUT (lumens):

When specifying high efficacy lighting, install the right amount of light in each room. Often this will not be a “one-for-one” replacement. In some cases the high efficacy lighting will have a greater light output, allowing you to install fewer fixtures, while other high efficacy lighting may have a reduced light output versus comparable incandescent lighting. Rule of thumb: You should be able to “lumen match” the incandescent lighting by specifying fluorescent systems that use one-third or one-fourth as much power.

SPECIFY THE APPROPRIATE COLOR:

Unlike incandescent lamps (light bulbs), fluorescent lamps come in a variety of colors, from “cool white” to “warm white.” For most residential applications, it is appropriate to specify warmer lamp colors (CCT=2,700 to 3,000K), as it gives a warmer feel.

BE AWARE OF THE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN MAGNETIC AND ELECTRONIC BALLASTS:

All ballasts are either “electronic” or “magnetic.” Generally magnetic ballasts are less efficient than electronic ballasts and can flicker, hum and have slow start-ups.

A SPECIAL NOTE ON KITCHENS:

Kitchens are treated very differently than other applications in the Title 24 Code because of their high potential for energy savings. Kitchens are the only application that specifically require the usage of high efficacy lighting. Specifically, the code requires that at least 50% of the installed lighting fixture wattage in the kitchen be from high efficacy lighting.

KITCHEN APPLIANCES:

Incandescent and magnetically ballasted 13-watt compact fluorescent (CFL) recessed housings (downlights) were some of the most popular lighting types in kitchens before 2005, and homebuilders now use energy-efficient alternatives. Using a 26-watt high efficacy downlight approach may actually allow you to reduce the total number of recessed lighting fixtures typically used to achieve a specific light level in the kitchen. Rule of thumb: If you used six 65-watt incandescent recessed downlights in a kitchen before 2005, now you can use 4 26-watt recessed downlights. Note that recessed downlights in kitchens with insulated ceilings (1-story applications) are now required to use Type IC (insulated covered) and Airtight rated. Because electronic ballasts can be sensitive to heat, be sure to use the appropriate recessed housing fixture and trim combination to maintain the product’s warranty.

What Is High Efficacy Lighting?

While the formal definition is somewhat complicated, high efficacy lighting is what we usually think of as “energy efficient lighting fixtures.” Many ENERGY STAR® labeled fixtures will qualify as high efficacy lighting, providing they meet the latest product specification (version 4.0).

IN GENERAL, THE FOLLOWING ARE CONSIDERED HIGH EFFICACY:

• Fluorescent and compact fluorescent (CFL) fixtures with electronic ballasts.
• Certain high intensity discharge (HID) lamps.

IN GENERAL, THE FOLLOWING ARE NOT CONSIDERED HIGH EFFICACY:

• Any fixtures with incandescent sockets (regardless of the lamp type installed in it).
• Most fluorescent and compact fluorescent (CFL) fixtures with magnetic ballasts.

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